David Brusie's posts - Japanese uPOST

Florence + The Machine, Gorillaz, and more albums to know about this week Florence + The Machine, Gorillaz, and more albums to know about this week

Florence + The Machine open up old wounds (and stick to old sounds) on High As Hope, while both Gorillaz’s The Now Now and what should be Teyana Taylor’s breakout moment, K.T.S.E., feel unfocused and undercooked. These, plus Panic At The Disco, Jim James, and Dirty Beaches’ Alex Zhang Hungtai in this week’s notable…

Labyrinth’s soundtrack is an essential part of David Bowie’s legacy Labyrinth’s soundtrack is an essential part of David Bowie’s legacy

A kidnapped baby. A Bog Of Eternal Stench. A Goblin King whose stretchy pants leave very little to the imagination. In 1986, director Jim Henson, producer George Lucas, and screenwriter Terry Jones combined these and other elements to make Labyrinth, a movie that depicts the horrors of being a teenager as a bedtime…

American Football’s second LP in 17 years is mostly worth the wait American Football’s second LP in 17 years is mostly worth the wait

A few stray guitar notes, some studio chatter, a drummer trying out some fills—these inauspicious sounds begin American Football’s classic self-titled debut from 1999, a landmark album that spawned countless emo bands that paled in comparison.

Of Montreal’s latest is a deft balancing act Of Montreal’s latest is a deft balancing act

Kevin Barnes’ success as Of Montreal’s figurehead and frontman has depended on his ability to balance extremes; funk and balladry, chaos and order, abstraction and focus. Like his stylistic predecessor David Bowie, Barnes usually threads this needle with ease and efficiency, but when that tension breaks to the…

Tom Petty’s greatest hits record remains the best of the best-ofs Tom Petty’s greatest hits record remains the best of the best-ofs

Despite the continuing growth of vinyl—and with Apple supposedly aggressively phasing out downloads—the streaming market is growing, leaving everything else in the rearview mirror.

On Teens Of Denial, Car Seat Headrest dares you to buckle in—and you should On Teens Of Denial, Car Seat Headrest dares you to buckle in—and you should

In some ways, everything there is to know about Teens Of Denial can be found in the video for the record’s centerpiece, “Drunk Drivers/Killer Whales.” The clip is deceptively simple: As frontman Will Toledo’s falsetto floats in, we see a road ahead. We’re speeding along in the darkness as passengers, buckled in to…

The Hour Of Bewilderbeast remains Badly Drawn Boy’s ramshackle masterpiece The Hour Of Bewilderbeast remains Badly Drawn Boy’s ramshackle masterpiece

Permanent Records is an ongoing closer look at the records that matter most.

What’s your favorite song of 2015? What’s your favorite song of 2015?

Welcome back to AVQ&A, where we throw out a question for discussion among the staff and readers. Consider this a prompt to compare notes on your interface with pop culture, to reveal your embarrassing tastes and experiences, and to ponder how our diverse lives all led us to convene here together. Got a question you’d…

Elvis Costello on writing a memoir while rejecting nostalgia Elvis Costello on writing a memoir while rejecting nostalgia

Elvis Costello’s new memoir, Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink, is a whirlwind tour of Costello’s life as a rock musician, son, father, television host, and songwriting collaborator with Paul McCartney and Burt Bacharach. Like his music, Costello’s book is equal parts acerbic and heartfelt, giving scope to the many…

A French teenager helps Americans with their revolution in Sarah Vowell’s latest A French teenager helps Americans with their revolution in Sarah Vowell’s latest

Calling Sarah Vowell a historian doesn’t seem right. She certainly deserves the title, considering her ability to write beautifully about history and, as the lengthly bibliography at the end of Lafayette In The Somewhat United States proves, research the hell out of her subject. Maybe it’s just hard to picture David…

Maritime keeps its steady course with Magnetic Bodies/Maps Of Bones Maritime keeps its steady course with Magnetic Bodies/Maps Of Bones

Davey Von Bohlen, lead singer for Maritime and former member of Cap’n Jazz and The Promise Ring, has one of those voices: simultaneously vulnerable, headstrong, world-weary, and confident, it’s so unique and expressive that it makes every song interesting. The years since Cap’n Jazz’s early-’90s heyday have made his…

On Poison Season, Destroyer broadens its sound with oddball charm intact On Poison Season, Destroyer broadens its sound with oddball charm intact

The press materials for Poison Season, the 11th record Dan Bejar has recorded under the name Destroyer, cite David Bowie’s chamber-pop classic Hunky Dory as an influence this time around. The touchstones—ornate strings, piano flourishes—are certainly there, but Poison Season is a looser, less-constrained affair. With…

A shaky concept can’t overshadow the infectious energy of Titus Andronicus A shaky concept can’t overshadow the infectious energy of Titus Andronicus

Given the band’s affinity for energy and explosions, Titus Andronicus is often compared to Hüsker Dü and The Clash, but a better corollary might be The Who. Both bands specialize in sudden tonal shifts from bombast to sensitive soul-searching, and like The Who, Titus Andronicus caters in collections of songs that work…

The Sklar Brothers on the creepiness of twins and being one comedic voice The Sklar Brothers on the creepiness of twins and being one comedic voice

Twin brothers Randy and Jason Sklar—together known as the Sklar Brothers—began their stand-up comedy career as part of the New York alternative comedy scene in the mid-’90s. Since then, they have hosted the ESPN comedy show Cheap Seats, released four stand-up albums (the most recent of which, 2014’s Sklar Brothers: …

They Might Be Giants, 33 years in and keeping up the good work They Might Be Giants, 33 years in and keeping up the good work

It’s been 33 years since Johns Linnell and Flansburgh formed They Might Be Giants, and 21 since they converted their two-man accordion-guitar-MIDI operation into a multi-instrument group, meaning they’ve fronted a full-fledged rock band for the majority of their careers. The two decades since the excellent John Henry…

Patton Oswalt’s memoir details the risks and rewards of film obsession Patton Oswalt’s memoir details the risks and rewards of film obsession

Silver Screen Fiend, stand-up comedian and writer Patton Oswalt’s memoir about moviegoing in the ’90s, begins and ends at a revival screening of Sunset Boulevard. It’s a fitting choice: The 1950 noir is essentially about what movies do to us, and what role a film’s viewers—“those wonderful people out there in the…

With “Mr. Big Stuff,” Jean Knight recorded a feminist anthem With “Mr. Big Stuff,” Jean Knight recorded a feminist anthem

In We’re No. 1, The A.V. Club examines an album that went to No. 1 on the Billboard charts to get to the heart of what it means to be popular in pop music, and how that concept has changed over the years. In this installment, we cover Jean Knight’s “Mr. Big Stuff,” which went to No. 1 on the Soul Singles chart in…

With Glass Houses, Billy Joel attempted to overhaul his image With Glass Houses, Billy Joel attempted to overhaul his image

Permanent Records is an ongoing closer look at the records that matter most.

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