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Behind the scenes of "behind the scenes at National Geographic" Behind the scenes of "behind the scenes at National Geographic"

Have you seen that "behind the scenes at National Geographic" photo where those guys are running from a bear? It's pretty amusing. But it's a fake. Super duper, 100 percent fake. So where did it come from?

Which Animals Appear Most Frequently on National Geographic Covers? Which Animals Appear Most Frequently on National Geographic Covers?

Nearly a quarter of all National Geographic covers has an animal on it. This infographic shows which of them get featured the most.

The best National Geographic readers' photos of 2014 The best National Geographic readers' photos of 2014

National Geographic just announced the winners of their 2014 Photo Contest and they are truly amazing. There are plenty more on their website.

Rare Shark Spotted In Russian High Arctic, Researcher Freaks Out Rare Shark Spotted In Russian High Arctic, Researcher Freaks Out

After staring at a barren seafloor for nearly three hours, National Geographic's Alan Turchik couldn't believe his eyes when a rare deep-sea Greenland shark suddenly drifted across the screen. (Warning: an excessively long stream of bleeped-out expletives to follow)

This Guy's Job Is to Hack Cameras for National Geographic Photographers This Guy's Job Is to Hack Cameras for National Geographic Photographers

If you've ever dreamt of a weird feature you wanted your camera to have for a specially specific purpose, the guy to call would be Kenji, National Geographic's very own tinkerer extraordinaire. Head over to their very own Proof blog for a peek inside his workshop.

The Best, Most Iconic National Geographic Covers The Best, Most Iconic National Geographic Covers

National Geographic has published nearly 1500 covers in its 126-year run. Here are five of the best – and how they came to be.

The best pictures from National Geographic's Photo Contest 2014 The best pictures from National Geographic's Photo Contest 2014

Everybody knows what the best thing about the end of the year is. It's easy. No, it's not Christmas presents. Or seeing family over the holidays. The best thing about the end of the year is National Geographic's Photo Contest. It's a tradition where we get to see just how awesome the world around us is.

How To Find A Mammoth In 20 Not-So-Simple Steps How To Find A Mammoth In 20 Not-So-Simple Steps

Mammoths Unearthed is a National Geographic special on archeologist Dr. Tim King and palaeontologist Trevor Valle hunting for mammoths in melting Siberian permafrost. Despite the oozing drama plaguing modern documentaries, it's an intriguing, surreal, and frustrating look at the reality of fieldwork.

Finding Mammoths Takes More Than Just Science Finding Mammoths Takes More Than Just Science

Despite hyperactive editing to infuse drama into the long hours of fieldwork, National Geographic's Mammoths Unearthed is a peek into the conflict of ivory economics and scientific research when hunting for mammoths in northern Siberia.

Luminous Nature Photographs Will Restore Your Sense of Wonder Luminous Nature Photographs Will Restore Your Sense of Wonder

The submission deadline for National Geographic's annual Photo Contest is still a month away, but this year's competition is already swarming with spectacular entries from photographers around the world.

Learn Just How Crazy Russian Smokejumpers Are Learn Just How Crazy Russian Smokejumpers Are

To be a smokejumper — the front-line firefighters who parachute into forest fires — in the US, you've already got to be a little unhinged. To do the same job in Russia, with antique equipment, for no pay, you must be certifiably insane.

The horrible beauty of Mount Hood, Oregon The horrible beauty of Mount Hood, Oregon

National Geographic's Photo of the Day is this picture of Mount Hood, Oregon, shot by Paul C. Glasser. A beautiful image of something actually quite terrible, as Glasser himself describes:

These Cat Photos Put The Rest Of The Internet's Cat Photos To Shame These Cat Photos Put The Rest Of The Internet's Cat Photos To Shame

In 2011, photographer Vincent J. Musi had the opportunity to shoot several of Houston Zoo's big cats on behalf of National Geographic. This week, Musi and NatGeo have been featuring select images from the series (some of them previously unpublished) on their respective Instagram pages, and they are positively…

Wow, the winners of the National Geographic Photo Contest are unreal Wow, the winners of the National Geographic Photo Contest are unreal

National Geographic just announced the winners of the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest for 2014. They're all so fantastic you'd swear they aren't real. Like the one above, which is so fantastic that it looks like a photoshop. But it is real—a stunning picture by Marc Henauer of Green Lake in Tragöss, Austria.

Hundreds of flying rays is one beautiful nightmare Hundreds of flying rays is one beautiful nightmare

This photograph of a large school of mobula rays by Eduardo Lopez Negrete is one of the entries for the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Keep in mind that these majestic creatures can reach a 17-foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. It may look like a nightmare but they are harmless.

I don't know where buildings start or end in this crazy Hong Kong photo I don't know where buildings start or end in this crazy Hong Kong photo

National Geographic's Photo of the Day—captured by Simon Kwan—shows Hong Kong in all its glorious urban madness. When I first saw it I thought it was a collage made with multiple shots and mirrored images. It's not. It's just the city photographed from Beacon Hill.

Kangaroos and koalas have three vaginas Kangaroos and koalas have three vaginas

Here's a little fun fact for your next Australia-themed dinner party: female marsupials all have three vaginas. That includes kangaroos, koalas, quokkas, and those cube-pooping wombats.

The Right Way to Flip a Coin (And Other Things Going Deep Taught Us) The Right Way to Flip a Coin (And Other Things Going Deep Taught Us)

One of the most earth-shattering things that David Rees has learned about flipping a coin: It's not random. "It's a physical process," he says. "And if you can reduce the number of variables involved, you can control the outcome." Yes, it is possible to learn how to flip a coin, and Rees can show you how to do it.

Scientists Are Mapping the Ocean's Plastic Because 99 Percent Is Missing Scientists Are Mapping the Ocean's Plastic Because 99 Percent Is Missing

Last week, some strange news swept the science internet: Much of the plastic scientists expected to find on the ocean's surface is gone, and no one knows exactly where it is. Now the scientists behind the research have shared a first-of-its-kind map of ocean plastic with National Geographic--and it could be key to…

The Bone-Chilling Freezer Where 10 Miles of Ancient Ice Are Kept The Bone-Chilling Freezer Where 10 Miles of Ancient Ice Are Kept

Since 1993 the USGS has been extracting ice cores from glaciated regions of the world and storing them for research. Scientists keep them in a gigantic walk-in freezer—the National Ice Core Laboratory—located just outside Denver. It's so freaking cool.

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